Review of Synology DS415+, How to Add Memory to the DS415+, Web Pages Not Databases

19 12 2014

December 19, 2014

As frequent readers of this blog likely know, I have not posted very many articles recently.  It seems that lately I struggle to find time to post interesting items to the blog, which is mostly focused on Oracle Database notes, so this is a three in one off-topic post.  I have been busy with a lot of items that are completely unrelated to Oracle Database.  One of those busy (non) work items is setting up a Synology DiskStation DS415+ NAS with four 6TB hard drives.

Part 1: Reviewing the Synology DS415+

Below is my review of that NAS, as posted on Amazon:


http://www.amazon.com/Synology-America-Station-Attached-DS415/dp/B00IKTSSIO/

I have previously purchased and implemented Synology Diskstation DS1813+, DS412+, DS214+, DS212+, DS213j, and DS112j units, so Synology network attached storage (NAS) devices are not entirely new to me (I also have experience with administering various Linux and Windows servers). Most of the Synology NAS units are configured primarily as FTP destinations, although the units also provide one or more Windows shares to network computers using either Active Directory integration or Synology Diskstation internal user accounts, as well as offering network time protocol (NTP) services (to security cameras, Active Directory, and/or a PBX system), and Nagios network monitoring.

For the most part, the Synology NAS units have been very reliable. That said I have experienced occasional problems with most of the NAS units that provide FTP services to security cameras. Eventually, all of the permitted client connections become “in use” due to the Synology sometimes remembering FTP connections long after the security cameras have forgotten about those connections. This connection “remembering” issue causes a situation where client computers attempting to connect for Windows file sharing are denied access to the server, but the problem also affects the web-based access to the Synology DSM operating system. There have been issues with the DiskStation DS412+ locking up roughly 90% of the time that a reboot is attempted through the web-based DSM, resulting in a blue flashing light on the front console that could only be fixed by pulling the electrical power cord (note that it is usually possible to kill phantom connections from the DSM interface, if that interface will display, so that a reboot is typically not required to recover from the “remembered” connections). None of the other DiskStations have experienced lockups during an attempted reboot (or any other lockups that I am able to recall).

The DS415+ was bought to take the place of a DS212+, whose CPU simply cannot keep pace with 15+ high definition security cameras feeding the NAS with motion triggered video clips via FTP. I had considered purchasing the new version of the DS1813+ (possibly called a DS1815+), but that model has not been released yet, probably would have the same Intel CPU model as the DS415+ (the DS1812+, 1813+, and DS412+ all have essentially the same CPU model), and likely would have had a higher electric wattage consumption compared to the DS415+ if I filled all drive bays. So, I selected the DS415+ as a device that had some known compromises, but with also some power efficiency benefits that are not present in the DS1813+ and DS412+.

The DS415+ ships with 2GB of memory in a regular memory slot, rather than being soldered to the system board as is the case for the DS412+, opening the possibility for future memory expansion. With two gigabit network ports, two USB 3 ports (one USB 2), and one eSATA port , the Synology DiskStation DS415+ offers decent storage expansion options, although those options are more limited than what is offered by the DS1813+. The DS415+ internally supports up to four hard drives in one of several software RAID levels (SHR, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10). Drive installs are potentially performed without using a screwdriver, although screws are provided to hold the drives in place if the screw-less arrangement seems too flimsy. Unlike the DS1813+, the drive carriages are held in place by a thumb-release locking clip, rather than a flimsy lock and key mechanism. The DiskStation DS415+ more than triples in weight with four typical hard drives installed – the light weight construction seems to be typical of the various Synology NAS units (at least those that support eight or fewer drives).

The DS415+ ships without an installed operating system, so the first task after powering on the DS415+ with the hard drives installed involves installing the latest DSM operating system. The process for installing the operating system is fairly simple, unless there is another DiskStation NAS on the same LAN (the directions provided in the printed quick start guide caused the DSM web page for another already set up Synology NAS to appear, rather than the operating system installation page for the DS415+ – the old Synology setup program that used to ship on CD with the NAS units probably would have helped in this situation). Once the NAS has nearly automatically downloaded the latest version of the operating system, the operating system installation should complete in a couple of minutes without a lot of issues.

The Synology DSM operating system offers a fantastic graphical user interface which implements HTML5 and CSS, displaying the interface in a web browser. Unfortunately, Synology tends to rearrange the location of various settings with each DSM version (and change the shape/color of icons), which makes it a little confusing when managing different Synology NAS units. Much like Windows Explorer, the File Station utility that is built into the DSM operating system supports context sensitive drag and drop, and well as right mouse button popup menus. The File Station utility that is included in the latest DSM version supports displaying more than 300 files in a paged view – that 300 file limit was an irritation when attempting to copy, move, or delete several thousand security camera videos on a daily basis through the GUI using older DSM versions. Like the other DSM models, the DS415+ supports telnet sessions, which allow access to the Linux command line and the configuration of scheduled script execution through the modification of the /etc/crontab file (side note: I have had issues with only the DS112j automatically resetting the contents of the /etc/crontab file when the DiskStation was power cycled – I believe that problem was caused by the use of spaces rather than tabs as field delimiters in the file).

A plain vanilla install of the DSM 5.0-4528 (as of today at update 1) offers support for network shares (Windows, MAC, and NFS), iSCSI, Active Directory Integration, FTP (standard FTP, anonymous FTP, FTPS, SFTP, TFTP), website hosting, WebDAV, SNMP, network time protocol (NTP), remote command line with telnet or SSH, integrated firewall, VPN client, USB printer sharing, and a handful of other capabilities. The DSM operating system’s native functionality is easily expanded through the download of free software packages from the Package Center. The packages extend the DS415+’s capabilities to include antivirus, Asterisk IP phone server, Internet radio rebroadcasting to networked computers, DNS server functionality, iTunes Server, VPN server, RADIUS server, email server, CRM and ERP packages, WordPress, IP camera monitoring (now includes a license for two IP cameras, additional licenses are roughly $50 per camera), and a variety of other features. Additionally, ipkg support permits the installation of more than 900 additional applications, including C++ compilers – which in theory suggests that the source for the Nagios network monitoring utility can be downloaded and compiled on the DS415+ (I was able to compile Nagios on a DS1813+, DS412+, and DS212+, and am close to having Nagios working on the DS415+).

I installed four new Western Digital Red 6TB drives, configured in a software RAID 10 array (DSM offered to automatically configure the drives in a SHR array during the initial setup, but did not offer a RAID 10 configuration at that time, so configuring the drives for RAID 10, to reduce recovery time in the event of a drive failure, requires a couple of additional mouse clicks). Peak single network link data transfer speeds so far have been impressive, at close to the maximum possible transfer rate for a gigabit network (achieving roughly 112-115MB/s ~ 919Mb/s), which is virtually identical to the speed seen with the DS1813+ that was using four 3TB Western Digital Red drives, and significantly faster than the DS212+ which has a much slower non-Intel CPU and two Western Digital Green 2TB drives. Pushing approximately 41.6GB of large files to the DS415+ from a client computer consumed between 9% and 11% of the DS415+’s CPU (for comparison, this test consumed 20% of the DS1813+ CPU capacity).

I did not test the DiskStation’s IEEE 802.3ad dynamic link aggregation – there was no apparent benefit when I tested the feature with the DS1813+, an HP 4208vl switch, and two client computers. The gigabit switch to which the DS415+ is attached does not support IEEE 802.3ad dynamic link aggregation, so it would have been a very bad idea to connect both of the supplied network cables to the switch.

Power Consumption of the DS415+(based on the output of a Kill-A-Watt meter):
* 1.1 watts when powered off
* 16 watts with no drives installed and unit is sitting idle
* 44 watts with four Western Digital Red 6TB drives while the unit is receiving files at a rate of 112-115MB/s (for comparison, this test required 46 watts with the DS1813+ when outfitted with four Western Digital Red 3TB drives)
* 39 watts with four Western Digital Red 6TB drives installed while the unit is sitting idle for a couple of minutes (identical to the value measured for the DS1813+)
* 14.5 watts with four Western Digital Red 6TB drives hibernating

Even though the throughput and CPU of the DS415+ with software based RAID are no match for the performance and capacity of a high end Windows or Linux server, the Synology NAS units consume far less electrical power, are competitively priced (even though these units are expensive once four 6TB drives are added), should yield a lower total cost of ownership (TCO), and are likely easier to configure and maintain for their intended purpose than either a Windows or Linux server. Like the DS1813+, the DS415+ supports up to 512 concurrent remote connections from other devices (a computer with five mapped drives pointing to the DS415+ consumes five of those 512 concurrent connections). The 512 connection count may not be the hard upper limit on the Synology NAS units – I have encountered some problems with the DS112J blocking connection attempts long before its 64 concurrent limit is reached – I do not yet know if this issue affects any of the other Synology device models. The lack of an available redundant power supply is a shortcoming of the DS1813+ and other less expensive Synology NAS units, but the power supply for the DS415+ (and the DS412+) is external, so it should be easier to obtain and install replacement power supplies for the DS415+ should the need arise (the power supply may not have a standardized connection, which would permit a replacement power supply to be purchased from a third party supplier).

Synology offers a group of customer support forums. However, those forums are apparently not actively monitored by Synology support staff. So far, other than whether or not Plex on the DS415+ is able to transcode 1080P videos, there has been no significant negative comments about the DS415+ on the Synology forums.

The Synology DiskStation DS212+ has served its role surprisingly well for the last two and a half years, even when equipped with slow Western Digital Green drives in a software RAID 1 array. While that NAS was able to support 15+ cameras that potentially simultaneously send video clips via FTP, concurrently allowing a Windows client to connect to the share for the purpose of reviewing the video clips was often just a bit too much of a load for the less powerful DS212+. I am expecting few problems from the DS415+ when serving in a similar role along with supporting a couple of optional packages such as the Media Server, Audio Station, Nagios (currently receiving a Segmentation fault (core dumped) error message when executing the check_ping test command found in my “Install Nagios on a Synology DiskStation DS1813+ or DS412+” blog article), and possibly Plex. Most of the optional Synology packages appear to be decent. However, the Synology Surveillance Station, while possibly useful, still seems to be an overly fragile, overly expensive, experimental package that tends to tax the wireless and wired network much more than the FTP solution that I use with my cameras (your experience with that package may be different than mine).


Part 2: Voiding the Warranty on the Synology DS415+ (Upgrading the Memory to 8GB)

The DS415+ ships with 2GB of DDR3 1600 MT/s (PC3-12800) CL11 SODIMM memory pre-installed, and from what I am able to determine, Synology does not and will not offer memory upgrades for the DS415+.  The memory is installed in a laptop style memory socket, so… I installed a Crucial 8GB memory card into the DS415+.  The greatest difficulty in the memory upgrade, other than the concern for destroying a $630 device, was breaking into the DS415+ case without destroying the plastic clips that hold the two halves of the case together.  I posted the upgrade process to one of the Synology forum threads, but I thought that I would also post the process in this blog article so that it is easier to find the steps for the process later (the pictures do not fully display in the Synology forum thread).

If you have never disassembled a desktop or laptop computer, consider just being happy with the installed 2GB of memory to avoid damaging the Synology. If you have never removed a memory card from a laptop, consider just being happy with the installed 2GB of memory to avoid damaging the Synology. Upgrading the memory will likely void the warranty – there was a label on the installed memory card indicating that the warranty was void if the label was removed from the memory – the label is still attached to my old memory card (so, maybe my warranty is still in effect 😉 ).

Step 1, unplug the Synology and attach labels to each of the hard drives. Write the numbers 1 through 4 on the labels to indicate the ordered position of the drives in the NAS. Release the latch, and remove the drives. Make certain that you ground yourself by touching a large metal object before attempting to open the NAS. When working on the NAS, do not touch any of the contacts inside the NAS or on the memory card (click for a larger view of the picture):

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There are three screws on the back of the Synology that will need to be removed using a #1 Phillips screw driver. Wait to remove the screw that is pointed to by the screw driver in this picture until you have successfully separated the two halves of the NAS case:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There are plastic clips permanently attached to the smaller half of the NAS case. Use a flat blade screw driver to gently pry up on the larger section of the case at the top-back of the case near the seam between the two sections of the case. A popping sound should be heard when the latch releases. When the first latch releases, move the screw driver to the position of the next latch and gently pry up to again slightly raise the larger section of the case at the seam until the next latch releases. Continue working to release the remaining latches along the seam. Once all of the latches on the top are released, it should be possible to pivot the larger portion of the case so that the bottom latches release. Separate the two halves, being careful not to damage the retaining clips that normally hold the hard drives in place:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There are four screws on each side of the drive cage – four of the screws are long, and four are short. Remove the screws using the #1 Phillips screw driver. Make note of where the longer screws were installed. Remove the third screw from the back of the NAS if it was not already removed:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Gently lift the drive cage straight up and then set it aside. Note that there are two slots pointed to by the arrows in the picture below – when it is time to re-assemble the NAS, the gold colored ends of the two circuit boards must be reinserted into those slots. There are two fan connectors circled in the picture – if the fan connectors are carefully removed from the sockets, it is possible to move the drive cage out of the way. The circuit board holding the memory card is below the metal plate – that metal plate should lift straight out of the enclosure, although there may still be some wires that attach it to the enclosure

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There is a metal clip at each end of the pre-installed memory card. Gently push the left clip to the left, and the right clip to the right until the memory card releases. When removing the memory card, make note of the location of the cut out section of the slot, so that the replacement memory card may be installed in the same orientation:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Slide the replacement memory card into the slot, and gently tilt it down until the two clips lock the memory card in location.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reverse the order of the steps to reassemble the NAS. Reinsert the drives in the correct order by referring to the labels. Plug in the NAS – the blue light on the front of the unit may flash for a minute or two.

If all goes well, the Resource Monitor in the Synology interface should show 8GB of memory installed:

dsm51-8gb

After a day or so, the NAS may show in Resource Monitor that it is using 6.9GB (or 7.0GB) of memory for the file cache, as shown below.

DSM51-8GB-2

Why install additional memory in the DS415+?  The 2GB of memory should be sufficient for most tasks that are typically assigned to a NAS.  I was mostly just curious after seeing a couple of questions on Amazon about memory upgrades, as well as on the Synology forums, without a clear description of the upgrade process, and only a passing mention of the memory specifications in a review of the DS415+.  There were a handful of discussion threads on the Synology forums were people were trying various memory modules in their DS1815+ units, and mostly failing to locate compatible memory modules (the Crucial memory module that I used was reported to not work in the DS1815+’s easily accessible memory slot).  So, I bought the memory, tried to figure out how to break into the DS415+ case, and took pictures as I put the unit back together (I thought that there was little point in me taking pictures while disassembling the NAS, especially if I destroyed the NAS during the upgrade attempt, but doing so while disassembling the unit is probably a good idea).

How does the DS415+ utilize the additional memory?  Mostly for the file cache (the NAS runs Linux at its core) – a day after the upgrade I checked the Resource Monitor and found that the Cached statistic increased from 670.5MB to roughly 7GB.  If there is an interest in running various background packages on the NAS (for instance, Nagios, Plex, WordPress, etc.), then the additional memory could have a significant positive impact on performance.  My installation directions for installing Nagios on a Synology DS412+, DS1813+, and DS212+ almost work with the DS415+.  I receive a Segmentation Fault, Core Dumped error message when trying to run Nagios or the Nagios check_ping plugin – I seem to recall seeing similar error messages when trying to find a compiler that would work on the DS412+ and DS1813+, so maybe there is still hope for Nagios on the DS415+ if I try downloading a different compiler (the ToolChain library for the DS415+ was released roughly a week ago, so there may be a solution – I was able to compile Nagios once and it executed without a Segmentation Fault error, but I could not reproduce the result a second time).

Part 3: Web Pages Not Databases

While I have had this blog on wordpress.com for a bit over five years, I had never tried using the standalone version of WordPress.  An opportunity developed recently to use the standalone version of WordPress.  The website for the company were I work has been in the process of being redesigned since roughly June by an outside web development company.  That web development company was making very slow progress on the website, selected to use the standalone version of WordPress as the development environment, and somehow was apparently given the task of designing the website so that it looked great on an Apple iPad, Apple iPhone, and even a now extinct Motorola Xoom tablet – any compatibility with Windows desktop computers using Internet Explorer seemed to be purely accidental, but the website apparently appeared fine on the developer’s Mac.  (Hint for developers: Test what you create using equipment that is similar to your target audience’s equipment.)

I became involved in the new website development a couple of weeks ago, trying to refocus the web development company on what the target viewers of the website will likely be using to view and interact with the new website – chances are that a too-large-to-ignore percentage of those target viewers are still running Windows Vista or Windows XP, and will be accessing the site using some version of Internet Explorer other than the latest version (some websites still are not compatible with Internet Explorer 11, so the potential target viewer may still be forced to run Internet Explorer 8 or 9 – Internet Explorer 8 is the last version supported on Windows XP, and Internet Explorer 10 is the last version supported on Windows Vista).  Ability to Print?  No, people have no need to print the website’s contents (especially not using a PDF virtual printer from Adobe or BlackIce, where all of the text from the new website was replaced by odd symbols) and have it appear on the printed page anything like what appears on-screen.  Viewing the website in a non-maximized window – who would be so silly to do such a thing?  Hamburgers are not on the menu – they are the menu, or it seems that is the official name for the three parallel white lines that sometimes appear on screen and sometimes in the printed copy.  Developers are full of fun surprises some days.

A week ago (now two weeks ago) the web development company was told to stop development on the website for a variety of reasons.  A lost six months of development, or an opportunity to beat one’s head on the table and hammer out a solution for the issues that still existed with the website?  I installed the WordPress package on a Synology DS213j NAS and on the Synology DS415+ NAS and had a go at fixing the issues with the website without affecting what the web development company had done to date.  I picked up the development process reasonably quickly (the five years of blogging on WordPress helped), but found that I was repeatedly flipping back and forth between WordPress’ Visual editor and the Text editor while trying to fix the issues and add additional text information to the pages.  Additionally, the path to files (and web pages) on the Synology must also include /wordpress (when working in a Telnet session, the actual path is /volume1/web/wordpress).  My HTML and cascading style sheet (CSS) skills were very rusty, so tasks that are incredibly easy in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Word, such as manipulating tables, took quite a bit of Google search skill, for instance determing how to right align or center certain columns in a table without altering the HTML TD attributes of each table cell in the column when composing the table using the WordPress Text editor.  The WordPress pages appeared acceptable on the Synology NAS units, so the same changes were applied to the web development company’s best efforts – hopefully this is not true, but I think that I made about as much progress on the website in three days time as did the web development company in the last three months.  Since then I have been fixing other minor issues, such as the search box disappearing when the website is viewed using a Windows 8.1 tablet that lacks a keyboard and mouse, and improving the website appearance.  I learned, or relearned a couple of skills along the way, so this process definitely was not a wasted effort.

The VP of Manufacturing at the company where I work has become somewhat of an expert recently at creating video and composing written content for the website, so the newly redesigned website is a good platform for his many years of manufacturing experience.  If you feel so inclined, take a look at the new company website, and leave a message here to let me know what you think about the website.  The website development company didn’t like my green highlight when the mouse pointer passed over links – I guess that explains one reason why I am not a graphics artist.

For future reference, this is the CSS code that I constructed to format some of the tables that appear on the website.  In the HTML code, I assigned the table to have a class of km_equipment_table, and then added the following to the style sheet’s CSS:

Handle general formatting of the table:

.km_equipment_table { width:100%; border:1px solid; padding:8px;  }
.km_equipment_table td { padding:8px; border:1px solid; }
.km_equipment_table th {background: #0072BC;}

Alternate between two colors for all but the header row of the table – note that this code is ignored by Internet Explorer 8.0:

.km_equipment_table tr:nth-child(even) { /*(even) or (2n 0)*/
 background: #F1F1F1; border:1px solid;
}
.km_equipment_table.tr:nth-child(odd) { /*(odd) or (2n 1)*/
 background: #FFFFFF; border:1px solid;
}

Set the column alignment of all tables that were assigned the class of km_equipment_table – the first column is number 1 (not 0) – note that this code is ignored by Internet Explorer 8.0:

.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(1) {
    text-align: left;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(2) {
    text-align: center;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(3) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(4) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(5) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(6) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(7) {
    text-align: right;
}

To keep the printed copy of the page appearing correct, I had to specify @media screen for several of the style sheets.  As such, a special style sheet, print.css, was previously set up to handle formatting when printing.  Among other adjustments in that print.css style sheet, I added the following so that the column alignment worked correctly in the printed copy of the web pages (note that this code did not work on Internet Explorer 8.0):

.km_equipment_table {
    border:solid #000 !important;
    border-width:1px 0 0 1px !important;
}
.km_equipment_table.th, .km_equipment_table.td {
    border:solid #000 !important;
    border-width:0 1px 1px 0 !important;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(1) {
    text-align: left;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(2) {
    text-align: center;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(3) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(4) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(5) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(6) {
    text-align: right;
}
.km_equipment_table td:nth-child(7) {
    text-align: right;
}

In the WordPress Text editor for the page containing the table, I constructed the HTML code for the table to begin as follows – the style and border specifications probably could have been handled in the style sheet, but the printed output was not ideal without these changes:

<table class="km_equipment_table" style="border-collapse: collapse;" border="1" width="100%">

To handle cases where the filenames on the old web server had to be redirected to the correct page on the new web server, adjustments had to be made to the .htaccess file – .htaccess files found in parent directories will apply to child directories also.  I spent a couple of days trying unsuccessfully to make the page redirections work, and then stumbled on a solution, again using the WordPress package on a Synology NAS as a test bed.  The old website had a number of web page addresses that contained ? characters, such as this one:

/page.php?menu_id=10

To send requests for that page to the WordPress permalinks naming convention that uses the article titles as the web page address, I added the following to the .htaccess file (R=301 indicates that this is a permanent redirect, while L indicates that this is the last rule that should be processed):

RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} menu_id=10
RewriteRule (.*) /industries/? [R=301,L]

To redirect a web page found on the old server that was named large_machining.htm to the appropriate page in WordPress, I added the following to the .htaccess file:

RewriteRule ^large_machining.htm/?$ /large-machining/ [R=301,L]

Those rewrite rules must be wrapped in the file, so a portion of the file may appear as follows – note that if there were a page on the old server with a menu_id=100, that entry must appear before the entry for menu_id=10, and the entry for menu_id=10 (and menu_id=11) must appear before the entry for menu_id=1 – otherwise the person attempting to visit the website from a saved bookmark (favorite) may be sent to the wrong web page:

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
    RewriteEngine On
    RewriteBase /
     
    # industries
    RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} menu_id=10
    RewriteRule (.*) /industries/? [R=301,L]
     
    # careers
    RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} menu_id=12
    RewriteRule (.*) /careers/? [R=301,L]
     
    # ... many more
    RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} menu_id=1
    RewriteRule (.*) /about/? [R=301,L]
    
    # Misc. redirects
    RewriteRule ^ABOUT.HTM/?$ /about/ [R=301,L]
    
    RewriteRule ^large_machining.htm/?$ /large-machining/ [R=301,L]
</IfModule>
    
# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
    
    # ... Standard WordPress entries here
</IfModule>
# END WordPress

Part 4: Idle Thoughts (Yes, this was supposed to be a three part article)

So, I was becoming impatient while waiting for the web development company to finally push the new version of the website over to the publically accessible website (I expected this process to happen a week ago, last Friday, but it did not go live until midnight today).  This past Monday I was beginning to think that this task was too much for the web development company.  So, I set out to learn a bit about Amazon’s AWS hosting options.  It turns out that Amazon offers a t2.micro hosting solution that is free for a year.  At the time I was almost completely unfamiliar with Amazon’s hosting offerings, so I signed up for a free account.  After puttering around for a bit, I managed to create an instance on AWS, figured out that I needed to assign an elastic IP address to the instance, determined how to connect to the instance using Putty, installed LAMP in the t2.micro instance, set up an FTP server in the instance, installed WordPress in the instance, imported the new website’s contents, changed the domain’s global DNS settings, and had a fully functional website in probably five or six hours – not too bad for having so little experience with those items. The website in the t2.micro instance crashed three times on me this past Tuesday during final testing due to consuming the full 1GB of memory that is allocated to those types of instances, but at least I think that I was able to demonstrate that the web development company was either seriously dragging this project out longer than necessary, or there is a problem with their method of assigning priority to projects.  The new website went live this morning with a couple of minor issues: 1) No one onsite at my company could view the website because the development company insisted on removing the www. portion of the website address (at companies that use an Active Directory internal domain, that causes the DNS name resolution to point to the web server on one of the internal domain controllers – none of those domain controllers has web server software installed); 2) The .htaccess file that I spent a couple of days creating was overwritten by a file written by the developer – that file either redirected most of the traffic to the wrong page (see my notes above about why the order of entries in that file is important), or sent the person to a 404 error page (page not found) for all historic web page filenames; 3) College was spelled as Collage.  Oh, well.  Close counts in website development, just as it does with horse shoes and hand grenades.


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24 responses

8 02 2015
Paul Jaruszewski

Thanks for sharing your ds415+ experiences. I am using a DS213J at home and work to backup work data and mirror to home and from home, serve media and backup my digital photography. At home I am running out of space on my litle two-placer and am looking for a big brother to that unit. Considering buying another two placer ( 215j ) given that two units at home will probably suffice ( until they don’t… ) or possibly the 415 as reviewed here or the 1515+. Balancing current needs, finances and future needs has been difficult as evidenced by the fact that I still haven’t made the purchase while my used capacity graphic is approaching 90%… Thanks again for taking the to produce this page. Reading about the memory upgrade you did leans me towards the easier to upgrade 1515+, although I am not sure it will lead to real improvement in speed. Also the 1515+ seems to have easier access to fan replacement. If I only had a rich uncle and could take costs out of the equation, then the decision would be easy…

Paul

8 02 2015
Charles Hooper

Hello Paul,
Thanks for the comments. From what I understand, upgrading the memory in the DS1515+ will be easier than with the DS415+, but there are potential memory compatibility issues with the pre-installed memory in the DS1515+ and DS1815+. This thread on the Synology forums lists some memory modules that were found to be compatible or not compatible with the pre-installed memory: http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=93519

The memory that I installed into the DS415+ is listed in that thread as not compatible with the DS1515+ unless you also replace the pre-installed memory on the DS1515+, which may void the warranty on the DS1515+.

I am hoping that there will not be a need to replace the fans in the DS415+, DS1515+, or DS1815+. I believe that to replace the fans, it is necessary to open the two halves of the case, which in my experience is a bit challenging with the DS415+, but may be less of a challenge with the DS1515+.

On the DS415+, DS1515+, and DS1815+, only the first two disk slots support SATA3 (6Gbps) speeds, the rest of the disk slots are SATA2 (3Gbps). If you ever intend to install a SSD drive into one of those units, try to install the SSD drive into slot 1 or slot 2.

If the DS213j had an external USB3 slot (it has two USB2 slots), I would suggest to try plugging in an external 4TB hard drive for additional storage space, but that does not appear to be an option for you because the unit lacks USB3 ports. There is some good news for you: the 6TB Western Digital Red hard drives are roughly $20 (USD) less expensive than they were when I bought those drives, and the DS415+ has decreased by about $30 (USD) since I purchased my unit. If you go into the DS415+ purchase with the idea that you are saving $110, the initial purchase price has less of a sting. 🙂

23 05 2015
Lance Faure

“On the DS415+, DS1515+, and DS1815+, only the first two disk slots support SATA3 (6Gbps) speeds, the rest of the disk slots are SATA2 (3Gbps). If you ever intend to install a SSD drive into one of those units, try to install the SSD drive into slot 1 or slot 2.”

The DS415+ datasheet (enu) states:

Internal HDD/SSD
3.5” or 2.5” SATA(II) X 4 (hard drives not included)

It does say anything about SATA3.

23 05 2015
Charles Hooper

Lance,
Thank you for leaving a comment. From https://www.synology.com/en-global/products/DS415+#spec
“Compatible Drive Type: •3.5″ SATA III / SATA II HDD”.

A SATA III drive will run at SATA II speeds when plugged into a SATA II port, so the product specifications leave a bit of room for confusion.

See this Synology forum thread: http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=244&t=95139
In that thread I posted the following output from my DS415+, which indicates that two of the drive bays are operating at SATA III with SATA III drives installed:

dmesg | grep -i sata | grep 'link up'
 
[   15.801631] ata1: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[   29.070224] ata2: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[   42.820963] ata5: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
[   56.195371] ata6: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sda
smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sdb
smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sdc
smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sdd
 
DS415> smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sda
smartctl 6.2 (build date Dec  3 2014) [x86_64-linux-3.2.40] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-13, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
 
=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Device Model:     WDC WD60EFRX-68MYMN1
Serial Number:    WD-WX11D44AAAA9
LU WWN Device Id: 5 0014ee 2603b0844
Firmware Version: 82.00A82
User Capacity:    6,001,175,126,016 bytes [6.00 TB]
Sector Sizes:     512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical
Rotation Rate:    5700 rpm
Device is:        Not in smartctl database [for details use: -P showall]
ATA Version is:   ACS-2, ACS-3 T13/2161-D revision 3b
SATA Version is:  SATA 3.1, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 6.0 Gb/s)
Local Time is:    Sat Jan  3 21:42:34 2015 EST
SMART support is: Available - device has SMART capability.
SMART support is: Enabled
 
DS415> smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sdb
smartctl 6.2 (build date Dec  3 2014) [x86_64-linux-3.2.40] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-13, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
 
=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Device Model:     WDC WD60EFRX-68MYMN1
Serial Number:    WD-WX11D44AAAA1
LU WWN Device Id: 5 0014ee 2603b0844
Firmware Version: 82.00A82
User Capacity:    6,001,175,126,016 bytes [6.00 TB]
Sector Sizes:     512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical
Rotation Rate:    5700 rpm
Device is:        Not in smartctl database [for details use: -P showall]
ATA Version is:   ACS-2, ACS-3 T13/2161-D revision 3b
SATA Version is:  SATA 3.1, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 6.0 Gb/s)
Local Time is:    Sat Jan  3 21:42:34 2015 EST
SMART support is: Available - device has SMART capability.
SMART support is: Enabled
 
DS415> smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sdc
smartctl 6.2 (build date Dec  3 2014) [x86_64-linux-3.2.40] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-13, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
 
=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Device Model:     WDC WD60EFRX-68MYMN1
Serial Number:    WD-WX41D34AAAA5
LU WWN Device Id: 5 0014ee 2b58f68f9
Firmware Version: 82.00A82
User Capacity:    6,001,175,126,016 bytes [6.00 TB]
Sector Sizes:     512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical
Rotation Rate:    5700 rpm
Device is:        Not in smartctl database [for details use: -P showall]
ATA Version is:   ACS-2, ACS-3 T13/2161-D revision 3b
SATA Version is:  SATA 3.1, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 3.0 Gb/s)
Local Time is:    Sat Jan  3 21:40:39 2015 EST
SMART support is: Available - device has SMART capability.
SMART support is: Enabled
 
DS415> smartctl -d ata -i /dev/sdd
smartctl 6.2 (build date Dec  3 2014) [x86_64-linux-3.2.40] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-13, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
 
=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Device Model:     WDC WD60EFRX-68MYMN1
Serial Number:    WD-WX21D74AAAAJ
LU WWN Device Id: 5 0014ee 2603ab0b8
Firmware Version: 82.00A82
User Capacity:    6,001,175,126,016 bytes [6.00 TB]
Sector Sizes:     512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical
Rotation Rate:    5700 rpm
Device is:        Not in smartctl database [for details use: -P showall]
ATA Version is:   ACS-2, ACS-3 T13/2161-D revision 3b
SATA Version is:  SATA 3.1, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 3.0 Gb/s)
Local Time is:    Sat Jan  3 21:41:23 2015 EST
SMART support is: Available - device has SMART capability.
SMART support is: Enabled
23 05 2015
Lance Faure

Charles,

No thank you very much for listening and getting back in earnest; that is wonderful news considering I paired my DS415+ with two (2) WD RED SATA3 NAS drives and put them in bays 1 and 2 so I am using the full SATA3 bandwidth! I was looking for clarification on this topic and you provided it with a link from the horse’s mouth (Synology) and confirmed with Linux terminal output (extra thanks for that; not that I fully understand it but enough of it to confirm your findings [sda is slot 1 @ 6Gb/s and sdd is slot 4 @ 3Gb/s]). I did write an android script back in the day in which I learned a tick about Linux and Busybox and installed a few Linux GUI distros to dual boot and play with but I’m primarily a Windows guy these days (too lazy now for all that thinking).

Looks like their pdf datasheet needs an update as well as the Amazon product description (taken right off the datasheet). They should fix this as they are downsizing their products capabilities. I was sure I saw that spec somewhere (from the same web link you provided), but after doing the research, getting the unit, and then collecting the documentation for it (ie: pdf not webpage) I thought I had made a rookie mistake but you set my mind at ease. Probably a cut-n-paste mistake from the DS412+ datasheet. Non-techs in marketing. Go figure.

Gotta say that I am using this on a Windows domain, am not an IT guy (engineer), and am only fairly proficient with Windows IT. I am no expert by a long shot and had this thing hung on our network in 10 minutes and configured for domain users/groups access and Cloudstation in a day. Synology DSM 5.2 with ACL support made my Windows setup a snap. If they made it any easier my kid could set up this NAS on a LAN (but not a LUN). Good stuff and its very snappy too.

18 02 2015
Andrew

Charles…I’m trying to upgrade my DS415+ using your excellent instructions and have a question. When separating out the two halves of the box, for me it seems that the snapping sound you mention is simply breaking the clip on the large part of the box. (From looking at it, both the small side and the large side each have their own “clips” that extend into the other side. Any additional tips on this for separating the pieces without breaking them?

18 02 2015
Charles Hooper

Andrew,
There may be two different case designs for the DS415+. Some people in the Synology forums stated that the case for the DS415+ comes apart just like the case for the DS412+ – essentially, after two clips are released, the larger section of the case slides toward the back of the unit. On my DS415+ there was a lip on the front at the top and bottom of the larger section of the case that would have prevented the larger section from sliding back. See if this video for the DS412+ helps (it did not help me, that is why I created the instructions on this page):

As shown in the pictures above, there seems to be four clips that hold the two sections of the case together. I am not sure what to tell you – I do not think that I broke the clips on my unit, but the snapping sound certainly was not expected. Let me know if you find an easier way to get into the case and I will update the article with your comments.

24 03 2015
Charles Hooper

A forum thread on the German Synology forum linked to this blog article -that German forum also linked to the following video, which at about 2:15 shows the person releasing a different set of clips than what I forced apart on my DS415+ case when trying to gain access inside the case. You might see if this video helps:

26 05 2016
kay_gsr13

I can confirm that the 415+ does not need to be pried between the cover. Just reach inside the drive housing and pull it over two black stops. This in turn will allow you to slide the male portion out of those clips on the small side. The video links does show this. I started to pry myself per the author instruction, but back off due to cosmetic damages being induced. Hope this helps others as them upgrade their RAM.

18 02 2015
Andrew

Charles,

Thanks for the quick reply and the link. That video was a lifesaver–my DS415+ apparently has the same design as the DS412+ as following those instructions allowed me to easily take the case apart. Onward with the next steps!

13 04 2015
AAron

I think my DS415+ case would actually slide about 3/4 inch and lift up. I popped the first edge as suggested (minor damage). After fighting the other side, I noticed it slid. Next time I think I can just unscrew, slide and remove. Hurray! I’ve got 8GB!

14 04 2015
Charles Hooper

Excellent that you were able to add additional memory to the DS415+ – your DS415+ now has 2GB more memory than is officially supported in the DS1515+ and DS1815+. It would have been nice if Synology made it easier to open the case without the risk of minor damage.

If you are interested in running Plex on the DS415+, you might take a look at the following article – with the additional memory in my DS415+ Plex was almost able to smoothly transcode two 1080P streams at the same time (one to a Windows 8.1 tablet that accessed the Plex website on the DS415+, and the other to a Sony Blu-Ray player). Various Synology forum threads indicated that the DS415+ was not powerful enough to transcode a single 1080P stream, so the additional memory might have helped:
https://hoopercharles.wordpress.com/2014/12/24/install-nagios-on-a-synology-diskstation-ds415/

20 08 2015
JB34980

Thanks a lot for your fine review, found out that crucial were proposing ram upgrades for the DS1515+……… it seems that depending the numbers of chips ram ugrade is working or not…. i used the 8MB with 16 chips, and everything is fine……… opening the case was difficult did follow the italian youtube video, so far did not broke anything and my DS415+ has now 8GB did notice the increase of cache memory..

21 08 2015
Charles Hooper

JB34980,
Thank you for the information. I think that the DS1515+ and DS1815+ support dual channel memory, which requires that the memory in each of the two available sockets must be very similar. So, that would make it a bit more difficult to add memory to the DS1515+ and DS1815+ in the open memory socket – lots of trial and error to find compatible memory without replacing the pre-installed memory. What I just stated agrees with what you posted – great if Crucial is now offering memory that may be used in the DS1515+ and DS1815+ without having to remove the pre-installed memory.

My DS415+ case is slightly wounded because that Italian YouTube video did not exist at the time that I did the upgrade on my unit. My DS415+ is still working very well with the 8GB of memory. Nagios and Plex ( https://hoopercharles.wordpress.com/2014/12/24/install-nagios-on-a-synology-diskstation-ds415/ ) are nice/helpful additions to the DS415+.

11 09 2015
JB34980

Charles,
I don’t think DS1515+ or DS1815+ use dual channel memory, synology specs indicate “up to 6 GB ( 2 GB + 4 GB ).”…… intel C2538 support dual channel up to 64 MB…….. which means 4 memory slots……. crucial have 16 MB stick but the cost is high $ 205.99 ref.: CT204864BF160B. My DS415+ is also doing fine with the 8 GB memory..
JB

12 09 2015
Charles Hooper

JB,
Thank you for providing the model number for the 16GB memory card. Crucial’s website for that part states that the memory is not compatible with the Synology DS1515+. I wonder if the memory was never tested with the DS1515+, or of it was tested and did not work? The specifications appear to be correct. Wow, $40 for 8GB memory or $206 for 16GB memory – I wonder if the price will drop closer to $125 by the end of the year? For anyone interested in trying one of these memory chips with their DS415+, here is the Amazon link:
http://www.amazon.com/Crucial-Single-PC3L-12800-SODIMM-CT204864BF160B/dp/B0123BRIDK/

You are probably right regarding dual channel support in the Synology. That said, I wonder if there is a Synology compatible Linux utility that is able to determine if the memory in a DS1515+ or DS1815+ is running in dual channel mode (of course the memory in both slots would have to be identical for dual channel support to work). The lshw Hardware Lister is apparently able to determine if the memory is running in dual channel mode, but when I compile lshw on the DS415+ and run it, I receive a “Segmentation fault (core dumped)” just as I did with Nagios initially. The source for lshw does not include configure, so I cannot seem to specify “–host=i686-pc-linux-gnu –target=i686-pc-linux-gnu –build=i686-pc-linux-gnu -–prefix=/opt” for the make. Here are the instructions:
http://www.ezix.org/project/wiki/HardwareLiSter

If you created the downloads directory following my Nagios install instructions, the commands below will download and compile lshw (version 2.16, because 2.17 failed with an error when compiling network related commands):

cd /volume1/downloads/
wget http://ezix.org/software/files/lshw-B.02.16.tar.gz
tar xzf lshw-B.02.16.tar.gz
cd lshw-B.02.16
PATH=$PATH:/opt/bin/
make
make install
28 04 2016
Charles Hooper

There is a report on the Synology forums that indicates the 16GB Crucial CT204864BF160B memory did not work in a DS415+ – person indicated that he only saw a blue light for 15 minutes after powering on the DS415+. See: https://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?p=432173#p432173

25 10 2015
Curtis Stanley

Charles,

Thank you for all the detail you provide in your blogs.

I have a DS-415+ and performed the emory upgrade using the exact memory you used. I am running ruby on rails in the Docker framework, and while it’s really fast and responsive, it loves memory. So the memory upgrade has been particularly helpful. I seem to get some errors when using the 8 gig memory that don’t seem to occur when using the 2 gig original memory. I have performed the memory test from the synology assistant, but am unable to interpret the debug.dat that contains the results.

After doing complete system and volume backups, I did a complete rebuild of the volume and reinstalled DSM twice..once with the stick 2 gig stick, and then the complete process again with the 8 gig stick. In each instance, immediately upon completion of DSM install, I ran the memory test from Synology Assistant and then downloaded the debug.dat files. I tried to do a document compare to see exactly what was different between the two documents, but I was unsuccessful in getting the compare process to complete.

In any case, I am wondering if my 8 gig stick is having problems. Would you be willing to look at the debug.dat files to see whatever you can see?

In any case, thanks so much for all your work on this blog. I have enjoyed it and it has been very helpful.

Curtis Stanley

26 10 2015
Charles Hooper

Curtis,

I do not know if I will be able to provide any help to you. Specifically, what errors are you seeing with the additional memory?

Based on some quick research, the debug.dat file is actually a .tar.gz file, which contains several system log files. If you have the debug.dat file on the Synology in an otherwise empty directory (folder), and you have command line access (TelNet/ssh) to the Synology, you can decompress the

cd /volume1/mydirectory
mv debug.dat debug.tar.gz
tar xzf debug.tar.gz

See this forum thread for some of the files contained in the debug.dat file:
http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=35628

I do not have time to review those files, but it you look through the entries in the log files, you might find something useful.

It is possible that there are some Synology system parameters that might need to be changed so that an app installed on the Synology is able to use more memory – if you search through the Synology forums for threads where people have upgraded their DS1813+ or DS1815+ to 3GB or 6GB of memory, you might find some of that discussion.

It appears that there is a forum on Synology’s forums that is specific to Docker. A couple of threads:
NAS crash on DS1813+ and DS1815+ with Docker:
http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=258&t=100554

Synology kernel does not support memory limits, so Docker is able to consume all memory:
http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=258&t=100502&start=15

Another article about Docker in general:
https://blog.abevoelker.com/why-i-dont-use-docker-much-anymore/

Maybe another reader of this blog article will have some additional information for you (maybe something similar to not enough swap space to accommodate the additional memory, or enough memory set aside for tracking the 8KB memory pages, or a 32 bit application hitting a 4GB memory limit).
From http://www.binarytides.com/linux-command-check-disk-partitions/ – checking partition sizes:

df -h
Filesystem                Size      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/md0                  2.3G    959.2M      1.3G  42% /
/tmp                    999.1M     13.9M    985.2M   1% /tmp
/dev/md2                  5.4T      4.7T    744.3G  87% /volume1
/volume1/@optware         5.4T      4.7T    744.3G  87% /opt

From Red Hat’s site, checking memory utilization:

 cat /proc/meminfo

Good luck.

24 05 2016
Tim

Curious as to your camera setup. Sounds like you’re not using Syno’s Surveillance app, don’t blame you there. I’m not fond of it. I like zoneminder, but not sure I want to tackle that on the DS. What camera’s are you using? Are you running a video mgmt system?

25 05 2016
Charles Hooper

Tim,
I tried to use Surveillance Station with the cameras. I have 16+ cameras connected to the DS415+ by FTP. Surveillance Station appeared to be too fragile, gaining and losing the ability to talk to the cameras from one release to the next. Licensing the cameras for Surveillance Station would have cost at least 14*$50 = $700, and the CPU in the DS415+ likely is not fast enough to do motion detection recording on 16+ high definition cameras at a reasonable frame rate. I have primarily used TriVision NC-336PW cameras: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DG19APQ/ There were no reviews on Amazon when I bought my first TriVision camera in 2012, so I took a chance on the brand. I also tried Y-Cam’s original 1080P bullet camera – terribly unreliable with motion detection that does not work. So, I went back to the TriVision brand when they released their 720P and 1080P cameras. I also bought some of the company’s indoor 640×480 and 1080P cameras. The logic is built into the cameras, they just need a cheap memory card, and an FTP server IP address to upload the recorded videos to be able to easily review the recorded video from all cameras in a single view.

23 11 2016
brian32768

Thank you thank you — I can confirm your RAM upgrade procedure works perfectly, word for word, on a DS416play. The case is identical in every way I can see in your photos. My only suggestion is to use something plastic, not a flat screw driver, to pry apart the case to avoid scratches. I used a diddle stick left over from my dad’s tube electronics days. A bicycle tire lever might work. I bent a credit card, it was not stiff enough.

A year ago I bought an Intel NUC and accidentally bought 8GB as 4GBx2 (a kit with two 4GB cards) so I had a 4GB stick waiting for another project. I used one half of a GSKILL F3-1600C11D-8GSL kit in the DS416play and it’s working fine. Specs are the same as the Synology 1G: DD3L-1600 CL11 1.35v SO-DIMM

I have had the DS416play running for about a week now and keep piling more tasks onto it, yesterday I installed Docker (from the Synology downloads page for the D415+, there is no Docker for DS416play!) and realized 1GB was probably not going to cut it.

PS – time for you to clear off your work area by recycling your antique book collection. 🙂
PPS – your work area is very tidy compared to mine!

23 11 2016
brian32768

Of course AFTER I got the box back together I notice the layout of the clips and realized there was an easier way and THEN I saw the video link! That’s the way it goes. I will probably never open the box again.

There is an English language version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhsSmOLQA_g

23 11 2016
Charles Hooper

Brian,
Thanks for providing the link to a video showing the easy way to disassemble the DS415+ case. The person in the video did a nice job of explaining most steps, but skimmed over a few steps that I explained above (such as how to release the old memory card, and how to seat the new memory card). Nice to hear that the same approach works with the DS416Play.

There are a quite a few antique books in my collection… I just recently re-opened that Borland Turbo Pascal 4.0-6.0 book for the first time in nearly 25 years since I am now having to take over development and repair of a fairly large collection of Delphi programs. At least I have not had to touch the Netware 3.1.2 book recently. 🙂

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